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Careers in local government

by Guy Murphy

Many young people in Knowsley will be thinking about potential careers and the routes they need to follow to get on the ladder. Over the coming weeks, we will profile different careers to help children and young make important decisions about their future career.

This week we are featuring some of the various roles in local government. Local authorities, such as Knowsley Council, are often one of the largest employers in towns and offer career opportunities across a range of roles. These include finance, governance, marketing and education.

We’ve highlighted some of the careers you could get into if you’re interested in working in local government below. You can find out even more via the National Careers Service www.nationalcareers.service.gov.uk

Revenues and benefits officers work for local councils and deal with housing benefits, rents, council tax and business rates.

Day to day, Revenues Officer’s complete a variety of tasks including:

  • calculate rents, council tax and business rates
  • send out bills and reminders
  • collect and process payments
  • recover rent and council tax arrears
  • arrange legal action against debtors
  • get money back from customers who have been overpaid
  • attend court

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course
  • a college course
  • an apprenticeship
  • working towards this role

 

University

Relevant degrees include public administration or business administration.

Entry requirements

  • 1 or 2 A levels, or equivalent, for a foundation degree or higher national diploma
  • 2 to 3 A levels, or equivalent, for a degree

 

College

Relevant subjects include a Level 2 or 3 Diploma in Business and Administration.

You'll usually need:

  • 2 or more GCSEs at grades 9 to 3 (A* to D), or equivalent, for a level 2 course
  • 4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C), or equivalent, for a level 3 course

 

Apprenticeship

You can get into this job through a revenue and welfare benefits practitioner higher apprenticeship. This typically takes around 12 months to complete and is a mix of workplace learning and study.

You'll usually need:

  • 4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) and A levels, or equivalent, for a higher or degree apprenticeship

Environmental health practitioners work in the community to make sure people's surroundings are safe, healthy and hygienic.

Day to day tasks vary depending which area of environmental health you are responsible for. However, they could include:

  • inspect businesses for health and safety, food hygiene and food standards
  • investigate outbreaks of food poisoning and infectious disease
  • collect samples for laboratory testing
  • inspect houses to make sure they're safe for people to live in
  • enforce environmental health laws and give evidence in court
  • investigate accidents at work
  • investigate noise and environmental nuisance complaints
  • provide advice to community groups or businesses and give educational talks to improve people’s health

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course
  • an apprenticeship

University

You should study for a degree qualification approved by the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health. If you already have a degree in a related subject, you could get into environmental health careers through an accredited postgraduate course.

You'll usually need:

  • 2 to 3 A levels, or equivalent, for a degree
  • a degree in any subject for a postgraduate course

Apprenticeship

You can apply to do an Environmental Health Practitioner Level 6 Degree Apprenticeship. This usually takes 4 years to complete, as a mix of on-the-job training and academic study at an approved university.

You'll usually need:

4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) and A levels, or equivalent, for a higher or degree apprenticeship

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